Voter fraud still a problem

By KATIE SAMALIS-ALDRICH and HANS A. von SPAKOVSKY
Posted 5/24/22

While many politicians on the left continue to downplay the issue of election fraud, threats to free and fair elections continue at an alarming rate, as our newest batch of cases for The Heritage …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Voter fraud still a problem

Posted

While many politicians on the left continue to downplay the issue of election fraud, threats to free and fair elections continue at an alarming rate, as our newest batch of cases for The Heritage Foundation’s Election Fraud Database show.

Heritage’s Election Fraud Database contains 1,357 proven instances of election fraud, a number that is steadily rising. Each case emphasizes the need for election integrity.

All but one case in the most recent batch are about fraud committed during the 2020 general election.

These additions don’t include the 156 criminal referrals made by Florida election officials in the state’s nine largest counties in cases connected to the 2020 election. Local prosecutors so far have refused to investigate or prosecute those cases, as reported by the Public Interest Legal Foundation.

One of the cases added to Heritage’s database is that of Krista Connor of Arizona. Connor signed and submitted an absentee ballot in the name of her mother, who had died a month before the 2020 general election.

After being caught voting on behalf of her deceased mom, Connor pleaded guilty to one count of “attempting illegal voting.” She faces up to 18 months in prison and a substantial fine when she is sentenced later this month.

Connor’s case mirrors another one in Arizona. Tracey McKee, a registered Republican, was recently sentenced to two years of probation after casting an absentee ballot in the name of her mother, who also had died a month before the election.

Jay Ketcik, a registered Republican and resident of The Villages in Florida, voted twice in the 2020 election. Ketcik voted in person in Florida and then voted by absentee ballot in his home state of Michigan.

Fellow Villager Charles Barnes also voted twice in the 2020 election: in person in Florida and then by absentee ballot in his home state of Connecticut.

Barnes’ election fraud was discovered only after the registrar of voters in Milford, Connecticut, consulted ERIC, the Electronic Registration Information Center, an organization that compares member states’ voter registration lists, to discover the double voting. The election official reported the finding to the proper authorities and, in a rare occurrence, law enforcement took an interest in doing something about it.

Another case of duplicate voting, from New Hampshire, also demonstrates the need for states to cooperate to combat this problem.

Edward Amirault pleaded guilty to a class B felony after voting absentee in New Hampshire and then casting an in-person ballot in Massachusetts during the 2018 general election.

In addition to having his right to vote terminated in New Hampshire, Amirault was sentenced to 180 days in jail, suspended for good behavior provided he doesn’t commit more crimes. Amirault also was fined and penalized $4,960 and ordered to complete 100 hours of community service.

Threats to free and fair elections will persist so long as states fail to act to improve their election processes.

Republicans, Democrats, and independents alike deserve to have fairness and honesty in the electoral process.

With November’s midterm elections fast approaching, it’s important for voters to know their vote will count and not be diluted or canceled by fraudulent votes.

The writers are with The Heritage Foundation (www.heritage.org) in Washington. A longer version of this article appeared in The Daily Signal (dailysignal.com).

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment