Odds & ends

By BART ADAMS
Posted 7/1/22

Last week’s Supreme Court decision overruling Roe v. Wade was met with less hysteria than many had expected. Much of the brouhaha has been limited to a few protests in large cities, too many …

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Odds & ends

Posted

Last week’s Supreme Court decision overruling Roe v. Wade was met with less hysteria than many had expected. Much of the brouhaha has been limited to a few protests in large cities, too many incidents of vandalism (most of which won’t be punished) and a few meltdowns in major newsrooms and faculty lounges.

The lack of widespread hysteria is appropriate, as, unfortunately, the ruling means less than some had feared and others had hoped.

Yes, Friday’s ruling was a great victory for human rights, as more than 63 million babies have died as victims of the original 1973 ruling. But legal elective abortions will still happen in America, though not everywhere in America. (At least surgical abortions won’t happen everywhere; pharmaceutical abortions will be much harder to restrict.)

In a perfect world, preborn girls and boys would enjoy a constitutional right to life. As is stands now, the individual states will address the issue.

Those in Washington want to federalize everything, but that’s not how America is supposed to work. Instead, the individual states are supposed to carry out this great experiment of democracy in their own ways.

Last Friday, the day the Court ruling was released, CNN posted an essay from Notre Dame law professor O. Carter Snead, who had a different take than most of that network’s talking heads.

“By my lights,” he wrote, “Roe and its progeny have been very bad for America. By virtue of those precedents, the Supreme Court imposed on the nation an extreme, one-size-fits-all regulatory regime for abortion of its own invention, without any justification in the text, history or tradition of the Constitution.”

When unelected judges effectively enact legislation — as happened with Roe — the nation automatically becomes less united. Those who feel wronged by the Court’s action feel disenfranchised; helpless. There is nothing they can do to counter the move, not even at the ballot box, as federal judges aren’t elected.

Of course, unity on abortion will always be elusive. But now, with the issue back in the hands of elected state legislators, citizens on both sides of the issue can feel more empowered to influence how their states address the issue.

***

Education Secretary Miguel Cardona was the June Porker of the Month,

Citizens Against Government Waste singled out Mr. Cardona “for trying to force taxpayers to bailout student loan borrowers.”

As CAGW reported, “Erasing student loans may seem like a good idea on paper but cancelling them would be a slap in the face of the tens of millions of Americans who paid off their student loans or never went to college.”

***

On a lighter note, The Daily Record has added a couple new offerings for word puzzle fans.

On Tuesdays, we’ve added “7 Little Words,” a fun brain-teaser. And on Fridays we’ve added both “7 Little Words” and “Word Roundup,” a variation of a classic word-find puzzle.

We hope you’ll check them out.

***

Independence Day is quickly approaching.

As John Adams wrote to Abigail on July 3, 1776, our most important secular holiday “ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.”

Let’s have at it.

Contact Bart Adams at badams@mydailyrecord.com.

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