RECORD FORUM

Bill a step forward in protecting dogs

Posted 6/24/22

To the editor:

For the first time ever, there is pending legislation that would strengthen protections statewide for the countless dogs kept chained outdoors 24/7 in all weather extremes, …

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RECORD FORUM

Bill a step forward in protecting dogs

Posted

To the editor:

For the first time ever, there is pending legislation that would strengthen protections statewide for the countless dogs kept chained outdoors 24/7 in all weather extremes, vulnerable to the elements. Filed on May 26, House Bill 1116 would prohibit keeping dogs tethered when the temperature is above 85 degrees or below 32 degrees, as well as during hurricanes, tropical storms, and other dangerous weather conditions.

In communities across North Carolina, tethered dogs are spending endless hours alone outdoors, many at the end of a chain. Frequently, these dogs are out in the worst weather conditions, lacking basic protections from the elements — and too often, they don’t survive.

For those of us passionate about animal protection, it is hard to imagine spending life this way. Dogs are social beings, leaving them constantly tied up outside means they become lonely, bored and anxious, which can lead to aggression. Chains can also cause physical injury, putting the dog at risk from extreme weather conditions and an inability to access food, water or basic shelter. It is a tragic existence.

This law also creates clear boundaries and expectations of pet owners and law enforcement agencies across the state.

For these and countless other valid reasons, states and municipalities across the country have passed more than 1,000 ordinances to protect outdoor dogs, with new laws being passed increasingly often. This wave of ordinances suggests we are in the midst of a shift in the way society views and protects dogs. It’s time that North Carolina join other states like Texas and Pennsylvania in requiring humane standards of care.

As president of a local nonprofit, involved in rescue and community outreach, I can attest to the fact dogs here are suffering. This legislation would be a huge step forward for the entire state. I urge fellow citizens to contact their North Carolina House representative.

Roni Kemp

Lillington

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