Review — ‘Avengers: Infinity War’

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Ten years ago, the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) began with the Jon Favreau directed “Iron Man.” Putting Robert Downey Jr. in the spotlight as Tony Stark, the film was the beginning of what would be one of the biggest franchises to grace the screen. Ten years and 18 movies later, we are finally being handed “Infinity War,” the culmination of all the ideas set forth in previous films.

Directed by Joe and Anthony Russo (“Captain America: Civil War”) the film follows the MCU’s latest villain, Thanos, as he tries to obtain all six Infinity Stones in order to “balance the universe.” This eventually catches the attention of characters all over the universe, and everyone from Star-Lord to Spider-Man is ready to battle.

While I can’t say this is Marvel’s best film from a critical standpoint, I can say it is easily their best film from a fan standpoint. Leading up to “Infinity War” multiple people (including producer Kevin Feige) promised this would be the “culmination of every hero’s journey throughout the films,” and it delivers on this promise. While it may be done subtly for some, this film takes a chance to explore almost every character that is remaining from the previous films, while still maintaining a sense of emergency in their fight against Thanos, which is no small task.

One of the biggest draws to the MCU films has been their treatment of the characters: while their films aren’t original in the slightest sense, many don’t mind because of how likable the characters are. This remains true in “Infinity War,” with one key difference: we are finally shown their human side. Even characters like Vision (who is practically an embodied version of Artificial Intelligence) are given emotions and vulnerabilities. With that, our main characters are finally given situations that actually involve stakes. Never have I ever thought in an MCU film that a main character could die, but this film removes that security.

But, while I had a grand time with this film, it does have a few small, albeit noticeable problems, mostly due to the pacing: it does get pretty clunky at times. Clocking in at two hours and 25 minutes, it is almost inevitable that a film with this many characters would get clunky, but it isn’t necessarily the characters that are the problem. The film decides to put all the various heroes in different places of the universe, which makes it so the film jumps around a lot. This could easily have been fixed if they would have all been together, but I sense it was the filmmaker’s decision to split them up in order to “disassemble” them if you will.

Another issue that was also seemingly inevitable is the fact that the story is a bit quick. I completely understand that you can’t make a six-hour movie with superheroes, but, it does begin to feel a bit rushed towards the third act. The first and second act are pretty fastpaced, and it feels as though the villain has a pretty easy mission.

In the end, “Infinity War” is the first Marvel film that I can genuinely say is made for the big screen. Seeing a film of this caliber with a live-audience is the way it was meant to be seen. Plus, its a pretty great flick!

A-Teen’s Take Rating — AJordan is a student at Triton High School. He is an aspiring reviewer.

TEEN TAKE

JORDAN RYAN LESTER

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