Overhills students get a glimpse of world of forensics

Posted 12/25/18

Overhills High School’s honors biotechnology teacher Stacie Siebert invited Allen Bricker, a forensic supervisor at the Fayetteville Police Department, to come speak during her class.

Mr. …

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Overhills students get a glimpse of world of forensics

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Overhills High School’s honors biotechnology teacher Stacie Siebert invited Allen Bricker, a forensic supervisor at the Fayetteville Police Department, to come speak during her class.

Mr. Bricker said this was his fifth visit to Ms. Siebert’s biotechnology class, mentioning that “it’s very rewarding,” and “two or three students are already planning to go into forensics.”

Ms. Siebert’s class is an elective and its main focuses are health, medicine, food science, environmental science, agriscience, forensics, bioethics and biotechnology careers. The biotechnology lab has approximately $30,000 worth of state-of-the-art lab kits and equipment.

The purpose of Mr. Bricker’s visit is to inform Ms. Siebert’s students on what a job in forensics entails and to set them up for their future careers. Mr. Bricker explained that as a forensic supervisor he works with latent fingerprints, crime scene sketches, shooting reconstruction using bullet trajectory and biohazard conditions, just to name a few.

Overhills biotechnology students learn about forensics all year, but anticipate Mr. Bricker’s visit as he can give them real-life insight into the job.

To illustrate certain tasks they may perform in the world of forensic science, Mr. Bricker demonstrated footwear impressions using foam, revealed latent fingerprints, and bullet trajectory using lasers.

Ms. Siebert enjoys this class as it properly prepares and informs students on the wide variety of careers that fall under the forensic umbrella.

“People don’t know you can get a BS degree in accounting and still work in forensics,” she said.

Forensics isn’t like what you see on TV, both Ms. Siebert and Mr. Bricker admit. Television often takes “poetic license,” Mr. Bricker said. Ms Siebert explained how on TV, DNA collection can be complete in a hour, when in reality it can take days, weeks or even months. Her goal is to prepare students for reality and to get them involved and on the proper path.

“It’s life changing, that’s why I love this course,” she said.

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